Piazza San Marco, often known in English as St Mark's Square, is the principal public square of Venice, Italy, where it is generally known just as la Piazza ("the Square"). All other urban spaces in the city (except the Piazzetta and the Piazzale Roma) are called campi ("fields"). The Piazzetta ("little Piazza/Square") is an extension of the Piazza towards the lagoon in its south east corner (see plan). The two spaces together form the social, religious and political centre of Venice and are commonly considered together.

St Mark's Square includes landmarks such as the Doge's Palace, St Mark's Basilica, and Campanile of St Mark's church. The restaurants include the famous Caffè Quadri, which was patronized by the Austrians when Venice was ruled by Austria in the 19th century, and Caffè Florian, which opened in 1720 by Floriano Francesconi, which was patronised by the Venetians when the hated Austrians were at Quadri's

A remark usually attributed (though without proof) to Napoleon calls the Piazza San Marco "the drawing room of Europe".

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